A Useful Abandoned Cart Flow for Klaviyo-Shopify Integrations

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Happy Tuesday!

Today, we’re discussing email marketing, abandoned cart emails, Klaviyo, Shopify, and automated email flows. It’s a bit of a change in direction, but I hope you’ll find it interesting!

Let’s jump right in.

What’s an “abandoned cart”?

First, what is an abandoned cart? For e-commerce businesses, an abandoned cart is when a customer picks out all the products they’d like to buy from that business, proceeds to the check-out page, begins check-out, and then just…doesn’t follow through, for whatever reason.

More than 70% of online shoppers abandon their carts at checkout. This IS something your e-commerce business will experience, but never fear! There’s a way to handle this through email marketing.

What’s an “abandoned cart email”?

An abandoned cart email is an automated email you might send to a shopper who has abandoned their cart reminding them that your product is worth buying and that you are an e-commerce business worth buying from.

How would you do this, you ask? Well, I’d suggest the help of an email marketing service like Klaviyo for your email marketing automation needs. Klaviyo integrates particularly well with Shopify, which is one of the most-used e-commerce platforms. The integration is quick and seamless, so you won’t have to convince your high school-aged technology wizard neighbor to help you out.

 Now, Klaviyo already has a flow for abandoned cart emails once you integrate the email marketing service with Shopify. What’s a flow, you ask? “In Klaviyo, a flow is an automated sequence that is set in motion by a specific trigger and then includes one or more steps.” says Klaviyo’s helpful website.

Why would you want to design your own abandoned cart flow instead of using the preconfigured flow?

However, let’s say you want to design your own flow. Let’s say, for instance, you want people who have one item in their abandoned shopping cart to receive a different set of automated emails from people who abandoned multiple items in their shopping carts.

You might want to do that because you find that people who have one item in their carts are looking with more particularity than people with many items in their carts, and should therefore be treated differently via email marketing.

Here’s one way you can design your own abandoned cart flow.

Here’s the good news: you can design your own flow to provide automated abandoned cart emails in response only to abandoned carts with a single item, as opposed to all abandoned carts! Here’s a quick guide to how I did it.

The first step in designing a flow is designating the trigger that starts people along the flow’s path. Now, for any abandoned cart flow in Klaviyo while using it with Shopify, you need to start off with a trigger being the event metric “Checkout Started” and include the Flow Filter “Only include people if they have placed order zero times since starting this flow.” Here’s a picture on how to set that flow filter up:

It’s extra important that you start your abandoned cart email flow with an event, because this will later give you the ability to use event variables in your emails. That is an ability you will not have if you start the flow with a trigger other than an event. That will help you write personalized emails and personalized emails are demonstrated to improve conversion rates by 10%.

Now, the next step is adding a trigger filter to our starting trigger. This is only if we’re designing an abandoned cart flow we want to segment down a little further (as we’re currently doing.) As we only want people with a single item in their abandoned carts in this flow, we’re going to add a trigger filter reading “Item Count equals 1.” Here’s a picture demonstrating how to set that up.

Okay! We’ve now limited the people in our flow to people who have started the checkout process, who have not completed a purchase since starting the checkout process, whose item count is only one. Perfect! Let’s continue.

 First, let’s divide our group a little further. Let’s differentiate between people who have purchased something from this e-commerce business before and new visitors.

Here, we would use a conditional split. Klaviyo writes that “A Conditional Split is flow component that creates two distinct paths in your flow, branching based on defined recipient properties and/or activity.” This is useful here because we can’t use a trigger split, which is defined as “a flow component that creates two distinct paths in your flow, branching based on a defined characteristic of the Flow Trigger.” We can’t use a trigger split because we’re not separating our group based on splits in the original trigger’s definition. We’re segmenting them by properties they already demonstrate, or – in other words – by conditions they meet.

The conditional split we’d want to use here is “has placed order at least once over all time”. Here’s a picture explaining how to set that up:

And let’s segment a little further, differentiating between people who have bought THIS product from the e-commerce store in question before and have a product worth over $45 and people who have bought from the store before, but aren’t buying a $45+ product today. We would add a trigger split after the yes path of the conditional split we worked out immediately prior to this one (the new buyer vs. return buyer split.) The trigger split we’re NOW working on should read “$value is at least 45.”

 Here’s a picture explaining how to set that up:

This is useful if you want to offer a bigger coupon to people buying more expensive products later in the flow.

So now, we have three distinct paths. We have 1) Never Ordered; 2) Ordered and debating at $45+ product and; 3) Ordered before and debating a product worth $44.99 or less. After all of these paths, place a “Wait 1 hour” Time Delay block. You want to wait at least some time before sending out your abandoned cart emails or your customers won’t have time to complete their purchase without your encouragement. Possibly worse, they might receive an abandoned cart email while in the process of checking out if the flow works too quickly – accordingly, it’s wise to wait a minute. I chose one hour because – personally – if I don’t buy an item within an hour of adding it to a shopping, I’m probably not buying it that day.

This is the point at which you send emails! Add an email to each of the three branches. You’ll notice that in the flow I designed, each of the branches’ initial emails has a different subject line. More specifically, the never-buyers get  “Are you ready to try something new?”; the shoppers of products worth less than $45 get “Welcome back, {{ first_name }}! Ready for something new?”; and the $45 or more high rollers get “Do you need another {{ event.Items.0 }}?”.

Again, personalizing the emails your consumers receive is hugely important. Segmented emails are much more successful than emails sent to non-segmented groups of people – you should be segmenting your flows, too! In these subject lines, I used event variables and personalization variables to use the consumer’s chosen product and actual first name, respectively. That shows that this business is paying attention to what your customer is actually purchasing and who they actually are through this business’s email marketing. Customers are more likely to buy from you when they feel understood, so this is important.

We need to add another time delay after all three emails, this time lasting an entire day.  I’d also recommend delaying the email send until noon in the time zone of the person receiving the email, as we want to make sure the person receiving the email is awake and has had their morning coffee before getting this e-commerce store’s second reminder to buy this product. Here’s a picture demonstrating how to do that:

After that single day’s length time delay, you do not need to add another conditional split to each of the three paths. This is because our top-level flow filter — the filter we began this flow with! — uses the “has placed order 0 times since entering this flow” to filter out anyone who does end up placing an order. If someone meets that condition, they automatically get removed from the flow and are no longer eligible to receive emails further along in the flow.

After our day-long time delay, let’s append another email. This would be the time to offer a coupon or discount convincing people to come back to your cart.

 After the last abandoned cart email you want to send, add…nothing! That’s right; we can let people exit the flow at this point. There’s only so many abandoned cart emails you want to send in response to a single abandoned cart

Alternatively, you might consider adding a thank-you email if someone did complete a purchase, but you might have your thank-you emails automated through another flow. That would be for the best, given that flows typically should have one and only clear purpose.

And voila! We have an automated abandoned cart email marketing sequence for Klaviyo-Shopify Integration where the item count of the cart is one.

 

Do you want cat pics in your inbox?

No, that’s not a trick question; yes, I am offering to send you a picture of my big orange cat, Tennessee Williams, once a week or so as part of the world’s furriest email newsletter:
The Intermittent Tennessee. There might be a few email marketing gems sprinkled in among the feline candids. Who knows?

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I respect your privacy and will never, under any circumstances, sell your information to a third party. I work in email marketing. Bought lists are the bane of my existence; you have nothing to fear besides missing out on cat pics.

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